Motivators

To grow your business, you need human capital that believes in your mission. To retain that talent, you need to know what they value.

Motivators

Motivate and retain passionate employees

Our DISC Plus Assessment not only includes the DISC profile, but it also includes the Values Index Assessment, which scores a person’s top motivators that drives them to take action. This addition of motivators makes WizeHire’s DISC profile the most thorough and powerful personality assessment. People are motivated by different values. To motivate and retain passionate employees, the best thing you can do is put them in a role that utilizes their values.

Find the right motivational fit

Our software not only tells you about their personality fit for a role, but their motivational fit, as well. If someone is a good motivational fit, then a person’s top 3 motivators will align with the values for a position. Depending on how strong the person is driven by a certain motivator determines what they value. For example, if you are strongly altruistic then you will value collaboration over autonomy.

The Seven Motivators

There are 7 motivators scored in the Values Index where people range from low to high, which determines what that person values. These 7 motivators are: Aesthetic, Economic, Individualistic, Political, Altruistic, Regulatory, Theoretical.

Aesthetic

Aesthetic

a drive for balance, harmony, and form

Utility

Style

The more you are driven by aesthetic motivations, the higher you value style, which means you value beautiful design. The less you are driven by aesthetic motivations, the lower you value style, which means you value utility and practical use.

High Aesthetic

e.g. Graphic Designer

Someone who places great importance in finding a good work-life balance, creating more than destroying and artistic self expression.

Utility

Style

Low Aesthetic

e.g. Maintenance Worker

Someone who has a bottom-line approach focusing on functionality over form or aesthetics.

Utility

Style

Economic

Economic

a drive for economic or practical terms

Reassurance

Rewards

The more you are driven by economic motivations, the higher you value rewards, which means you value competitive performance. The lower you are driven by economic motivations, the lower you value rewards, which means you value reassurance and positive praise.

High Economic

e.g. Salesperson

Someone who is very competitive focused on performance and minimizing the bottom-line.

Reassurance

Rewards

Low Economic

e.g. Customer Service Representative

Someone who tries to help meet customers' needs before his or her own.

Reassurance

Rewards

Individualistic

Individualistic

a drive to stand out as independent and unique

Teamwork

Independence

The more you are driven by individualistic motivations, the higher you value independence, which means you value working autonomously. The less you are driven by individualistic motivations, the lower you value independence, which means you value teamwork.

High Individualistic

e.g. Journalist

Someone who demonstrates high independence and projects self-confidence.

Teamwork

Independence

Low Individualistic

e.g. Firefighter

Someone who is able to balance the needs of both others and self to solve a problem.

Teamwork

Independence

Political

Political

a drive to be in control or have influence

Partnership

Leadership

The more you are driven by political motivations, the higher you value leadership, which means you value power. The less you are driven by political motivations, the lower you value leadership, which means you value partnership and community.

High Political

e.g. CEO

Someone who is a very strong leader, and able to take control of a variety of initiatives and maintain control.

Partnership

Leadership

Low Political

e.g. Community Manager

Someone who tends to be non-competitive and demonstrate a higher service orientation.

Partnership

Leadership

Altruistic

Altruistic

a drive for humanitarian efforts or help others altruistically

Autonomy

Collaboration

The more you are driven by altruistic motivations, the higher you value collaboration, which means you value supporting others. The less you are driven by altruistic motivations, the lower you value collaboration, which means you value autonomy and self-reliance.

High Altruistic

e.g. Nurse

Someone who has a very high sincerity factor and a high empathy for others' needs.

Autonomy

Collaboration

Low Altruistic

e.g. Accountant

Someone who is concerned for others without giving everything away; a logical stabilizer.

Autonomy

Collaboration

Regulatory

Regulatory

a drive to establish order, routine, and structure

Flexibility

Structure

The more you are driven by regulatory motivations, the higher you value structure, which means you value organization. The less you are driven by regulatory motivations, the lower you value structure, which means you value flexibility and originality.

High Regulatory

e.g. Police Officer

Someone who has a strong preference for following established systems.

Flexibility

Structure

Low Regulatory

e.g. Inventor

Someone who is a problem solver, able to shift gears and projects in a flexible way.

Flexibility

Structure

Theoretical

Theoretical

a drive for knowledge, learning, and understanding

Instinct

Knowledge

The more you are driven by theoretical motivations, the higher you value knowledge, which means you value wisdom. The less you are driven by theoretical motivations, the lower you value knowledge, which means you value instinct and intuition.

High Theoretical

e.g. Librarian

Someone who is passionate about learning for its own sake, continually in learning mode and bringing a very high degree of technical or knowledge-based credibility.

Instinct

Knowledge

Low Theoretical

e.g. Interior Designer

Someone who is less concerned with the big picture or knowledge for knowledge’s sake.

Instinct

Knowledge

Want to hire and retain great talent?

Align people with their values and the motivators for a job.